This is the section where you'll find most of the code I've written as well as information about any project I may be involed in right now. As you can see, I'm not a great programmer. It's mainly something that fascinates me in the sense that it allows me to learn something new every single day. After all, this is not something easy to find: a permanent source of interesting challenges. If you need to report a bug with any of the applications I wrote or packaged, feel free to report it here. Log in as username "bug" and password "bug" if you don't feel like applying for a new account.



Development
Application bundled with SGI Foundation Software, and developed to interact with the Axeda Cloud Service to provide SGI customers with 24x7 monitoring and fault notification.
Short application written in C to convert units from the metrical to the Imperial system, back and forth. Believe it or not, after 7 years living here in the USA (and around 10 years living in countries that still use the Imperial system, since I lived in Ireland before), I still cannot convert these easily. Hopefully, one of these days Americans will discover how great the metric system is, and the British and Irish will also start driving on the right-hand side.
A search plugin for the Firefox browser following the standards of the OpenSearch that will allow you to easily search the catalogue of the Saint Paul Public Library (Minnesota, USA).


Development
(unmaintained)
The homeip shell script helps you stay updated about the IP that your Cisco 675 DSL router is assigned when configured in PPP mode. It automatically sends an email to whichever email address you specify in the script if you configure it as a cron job in your Linux system. I don't see why it would not work on other Unices too, but I didn't give it a try.
The hey script is a simple shell script that works on Linux and IRIX to send messages to other X users on a network. It is widely used by SGI employees to send messages to each other. It was written by Jeremy Shawley, and I simply fixed some bugs and built the RPM.
The osptools are a collection of scripts that I wrote for Open Spaces Technologies. Basically, they allow you to do pretty basic stuff: kill Netscape in an orderly fashion whenever it is bothering you much, make a backup copy of its most important files, clean up its cache, clean up the directories where RPMs get built by default in Red Hat (they tend to clutter really quickly), prepare an overall system report that gets sent to whichever email address you specify, etc.
Small tool written in Tcl/Expect to allow the synchronization of jpilot database files using a regular FTP account. It is a poor man's synchronization tool for those people who like jpilot as a PIM application but do not have a Palm Pilot device.
A shell script to automate the process of downloading Mozilla's source code, building and installing the resulting binaries on your system.


Packaging
(unmaintained)
Daniel Mercer and Daniel Sully wrote this Perl script that emulates the hinv command from SGI's IRIX, and I packaged it into an RPM. This script provides you with a comprehensive hardware inventory of your system obtained from the /proc filesystem. It's quite useful to troubleshoot cases and see whether or not the kernel recognizes some hardware.
PCPMON is a graphical monitor for SGI's performance-monitorign package Performance Co-Pilot (PCP). It is written by Michal Kara, and I put together the RPMs.
I didn't write this. I simply packaged the application as an RPM package that can be installed in Red Hat Linux. This is a security application to detect rootkits that may have been installed in your system. Pretty cool. Give it a try.